A Day to Reflect & Remember

At the Oklahoma City National Memorial, two large "walls" frame the reflecting pool.  The one shown here says 9:01 and it's twin, 9:03.  the bomb was at 9:02, at the location of the pool.

At the Oklahoma City National Memorial, two large “gates” frame the reflecting pool. The one shown here says 9:01 and it’s twin, 9:03. the bomb was at 9:02, at the location of the pool.

"Chairs" represent the 168 lives lost.  Their placement on the site of the Federal Building, represents its nine floors  and where each victim was located.

“Chairs” represent the 168 lives lost. Their placement on the site of the Federal Building, represents its nine floors and where each victim was located.

Today was the longest drive of our trip.  It actually wasn’t bad.  We headed north out of Austin, glad to be ahead of their next wave of expected rain, towards a foggy Dallas.

In Dallas we saw the site of the JFK assassination.  We couldn’t remember seeing it before (so that’s just the same as never doing it) and it was another sobering moment on what is turning into an appropriate Memorial week tour.

On the road in Oklahoma.

On the road in Oklahoma.

The landscape in north Texas was pretty, with gently rolling hills. Since the official speed limit is 70 and the traffic light, we made good time.

Crossing the Red River into Oklahoma, I learned it really is red.  In contrast, the hills were even greener as we passed ranch after farm, etc. We ventured off the interstate and took a more rural route into Norman, home of the University of Oklahoma. It’s a very pretty, clean, organized campus. The blue skies were glorious and the temps in perfect 70s.  These photos of OU are for you, Linda.

University of Oklahoma.     OU - these are for you, Linda.     DSC_0766

In Oklahoma City we visited the Memorial of the Alfred Murrah Federal Building bombing. This tragedy seems even more unbelievable because it happened in this place – seemingly so perfectly, and safely, middle-American.

After passing more ranches and dozens of pumping oil rigs, we reached our destination of Wichita, Kansas.

Tonight, I won’t end with any trivia, just a few photos and these words from the Oklahoma City National Memorial:

We come here to remember

Those who were killed, those who survived and those changed forever.

May all who leave here know the impact of violence.

May this memorial offer comfort, strength, peace, hope and serenity.

One of the two mammoth bronze "gates".

Posted on May 27, 2015, in USA and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Special, thanks, Karen for sharing. Bette

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