Ngala: Our Own Cowardly Lion

The Lion Queen?

The Lion Queen?

After an extremely windy night, the temperature stayed about 30 degrees cooler today with breezes all morning. We trekked to the Southern border this afternoon and saw baby Elephants (even nursing), Giraffe, and Zebra. So cute!

We also spent some time watching a leopard, believed to be one we had seen the day prior. Some Leopards are what they describe as “relaxed” and easier to observe. Like with people, it’s a personality issue. . .

Eventually, we turned a corner and there was the staff cooking a fabulous breakfast. Linens, glassware, champagne, yogurt/granola cups each with special nametags for us, and breakfast made to order – it was heaven.

Human Interaction

Back at Camp, my husband and I went to tour the nearby village of Welverdind. It’s a typical village and we visited a school and a day care center. The children were so cute and the seventh graders asked questions about what it is like in Miami. Everyone seemed happy and healthy – but they live in a village with no running water, and this is not unusual.

&Beyond, the company that arranged our trip, does a lot to help the locals, as well as the environment.

It was a moving and emotional experience.

Our afternoon was partly spent doing some incredible tracking of a Lion. It was the same Lion we had previously seen – but now the lioness was gone. He was sort of flushed out of the thicket in which he was lounging, and walked off across the riverbank. It was magical to watch our tracker, Adam find this Lion. He is a man of few words and with nods of his head and slight hand movements would signal Rob where to go. In this case – it was a lot of crashing through thick thorny bushes. We would see the Lion, then he would disappear from view – then Adam would spot a paw print in the sand and off we’d go again. This is the Lion previously described as a “sissy” and a “nancy pants” by Rob; he is powerful, very large and beautiful ~ so we dubbed him the “Lion Queen”.

Posted on September 17, 2010, in Africa and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Your thoughts?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: